RubyNation 2017 Program

Eileen Uchitelle

Eileen Uchitelle

Eileen Uchitelle is a Senior Systems Engineer at GitHub where she works on improving the GitHub application, related systems, and the Ruby on Rails framework. Eileen is an avid contributor to open source and is a member of the Rails Core Team. She's passionate about performance, security, and getting new programmers contributing to OSS.

Building the Rails ActionDispatch::SystemTestCase Framework

At the 2014 RailsConf DHH declared system testing would be added to Rails. Three years later, Rails 5.1 makes good on that promise by introducing a new testing framework: ActionDispatch::SystemTestCase. The feature brings system testing to Rails with zero application configuration by adding Capybara integration. After a demonstration of the new framework, we'll walk through what's uniquely involved with building OSS features & how the architecture follows the Rails Doctrine. We'll take a rare look at what it takes to build a major feature for Rails, including goals, design decisions, & roadblocks.

Andrew Faraday

Andrew Faraday

Andrew Faraday is a rails developer of seven years with a degree in music and a life-long interest in stories, music and games. Professionally, I’ve spent years integrating web applications with large legacy databases, as efficiently as possible. I’ve been known to present radio shows and panel games at conferences, as well as the occasional conference talk.

Just A Ruby Minute

The game of Just A Minute has been delighting British audiences for almost half a century. Join us as our panel are challenged to speak for a minute without hesitation, repetition or deviation. It’s fun, it’s fast and you might even learn something.

Casey Watts

Casey Watts!

Casey Watts! works for Heroku, doing Ember. His super-power is empathy and helping others become more empathetic. He never leaves home without bubbles. He has a background both in psychology and in software development, making him well prepared to discuss psychology with developers. He studied neurobiology at Yale University, and he co-published a few neurobiology papers.

A Neurobiologist's Guide to Mind Manipulation

A useful-psychology double-whammy: (A) Developers are great systems thinkers. Surprise: your brain is a system too! Reframe frustration into accomplishment, and become a more effective and bubbly person using a frontal cortex feedback loop. (B) Want your team to be the happiest, most productive team around? Recent psychology research reveals one key attribute of the most successful teams, and it’s within your influence.

Sam Phippen

Sam Phippen

Sam Phippen is an Engineer at DigitalOcean, RSpec core team member, and all round Ruby aficionado. You may know him for being English, but he lives in New York City now. He’s sad that he can’t hug every cat.

Type. Context.

Every language has at least one big idea behind it. In Ruby we cherish the powers of abstraction in the language and the conventions of Rails. Experienced Ruby programmers lean on these ideas without a thought. Imagine my surprise when I changed jobs, stopped programming Ruby full time, and those ideas were nowhere around.

This talk is the antidote to the “x language is cool talk”. It’s a talk where you’ll learn about the ideas behind a couple of current ‘hot’ languages. You’ll learn how new languages change the way you program. We’ll find some gaps in Ruby and bring some neat stuff back.

Kerri Miller

Kerri Miller

Kerri Miller is a Software Developer and Team Lead based in the Pacific Northwest. She has worked at enterprise companies, international ad agencies, boutique consultancies, start-ups, mentors and teaches students, and finds time to work on Open Source projects. Having an insatiable curiosity, she has worked as a lighting designer, marionette puppeteer, sous chef, and professional poker player, and enjoys hiking, collecting Vespas, and working with glass.

Crescent Wrenches and Debuggers: Building Your Own Toolkit For Rational Inquiry

Software exists in a constant state of failure, facing pressure on many fronts - malicious intruders, hapless users, accidental features, and our own limits of imagination all conspire to bring our system to a screeching halt. Untangle even the most tangled of Gordian Knots by building your own toolkit for inquiry, by relying on the simplest technique of all: asking “why?”

This presentation will discuss the challenges and potential solutions for refreshing multiple application environments (Development/Staging/UAT/etc.) with data from a Production database, while keeping some amount of table data intact from the prior database after the Production restore.

Steve Hackley

Steve Hackley

When not white boarding out solutions with his team, Steve Hackley can be found with the hiking boots on traversing the switchbacks of the Appalachian Trail, or cooking out on the deck at home. With almost 20 years of web development and management experience in all areas including pre-sales, strategy, consulting, operations, and development, Steve has been responsible for assembling and leading several development teams implementing various technologies ( .Net Stack, BI technologies, Ruby on Rails) for clients believing in the notion ‘work smarter, not harder’.

Keeping Data and Integrations in Sync

This presentation will discuss the challenges and potential solutions for refreshing multiple application environments (Development/Staging/UAT/etc.) with data from a Production database, while keeping some amount of table data intact from the prior database after the Production restore.

Adam Cuppy

Adam Cuppy

Adam Cuppy is: Master of Smile Generation. Ambassador of Company Culture. Tech Entreprenur. Speaker/Educator. One-time Professional Actor @osfashland. Husband. Chief Zealous Officer @CodingZeal.

What if Shakespeare Wrote Ruby?

Did you know that Shakespeare wrote almost no direction into his plays? No fight direction. No staging. No notes to the songs. Of the 1700 words he created, there was no official dictionary. That’s right the author of some of the greatest literary works in history, which were filled with situational complexity, fight sequences and music, include NO documentation! How did he do it?

In this talk, we’re going “thee and thou.” I’m going to give you a crash course in how: Shakespeare writes software.

Nick Heiner

Nick Heiner

Nick Heiner is a senior software engineer at the United States Digital Service. Prior to that, he worked at Opower, Google, and Microsoft, and graduated from Cornell. He has contributed to open source projects like Eslint, Bower, Foundation, and Chai. He writes about technology and politics on Medium.

The Most Good You Can Do as a Technologist

How can you use your tech powers for good? I’ve worked at Fortune 100 companies, double-bottom-line companies, and the United States Digital Service at the White House. I’ll orient you to the landscape of opportunities to use your skills to improve the world, ranging from new jobs to side projects.

Katherine McClintic

Katherine McClintic

I'm a history teacher turned developer currently working as a Software Engineer. I'm a proud native of Washington, DC, where I teach to learn as the Director of Education for Women Who Code DC. When I’m not bug hunting you’ll find me making awful puns, practicing the bodhran, and vociferously defending the Oxford comma.

SEO is Not a Four-Letter Word

How can your startup get more users to see your app in the first pages of Google results without spending money on advertising? Together we’ll walk through a way to create your own data structures for Google to consume using JSON-LD and the data you already have–no gems or cursing necessary.

David Bock

David Bock

David Bock turned to programming Ruby full time in 2006, after an upstanding career using Java in the Federal Contracting space, and he has never looked back. He is now corrupting the minds of our youth by posing at a "Teacher’s Assistant" for a java-based high school curriculum, only to expose teenagers to Ruby and tempt them with the Dark Side of the Force. Dave is also the director of the Loudoun Computer Science Initiative.

A Rubyist Takes a Look at Crystal

Ruby syntax? Compiled? With strong typing? 2x4 times the performance? As an educator, I teach a lot of cool algorithmic stuff. As a rubyist, I want the syntax I know and love. As a computer scientist, this creates a tension over algorithmic performance. So I took a look at crystal and liked what I saw. Will you?

Robert Mosolgo

Robert Mosolgo

Robert Mosolgo, works on GraphQL at GitHub. In open-source, you’ll find him poking around with APIs, compilers, and runtimes. Besides coding, he enjoys eating, growing plants, and spending time with his family.

Solving GraphQL’s Challenges

GraphQL empowers your API clients by serving type-safe, predictable and flexible data from your application. JavaScript developers rejoice! But what about the server? Let’s explore GraphQL for Ruby servers. First, we’ll learn some GraphQL basics and see what it looks like to serve GraphQL from a Ruby app. Then, we’ll look at how we solve some web service challenges at GitHub: authentication, authorization and load management. We’ll see how these solutions compare to their REST equivalents and you’ll be ready to take GraphQL for a spin in your app!

Polly Schandorf

Polly Schandorf

In her previous life, Polly was a teacher of elementary through high school students. After being introduced to coding using a Rasberry Pi in a teacher workshop - she was hooked, and never looked back. She is totally fascinated with fermented foods and makes her own Kombucha, Kefir and Red Wine Vinegar.

Let's Get Creative with Arguments

Would you like better error messages? Or methods that are clearer to the caller. How about more flexibility ? Most of us have a preference for parameters, but sometimes there are better options in certain circumstances. We’ll look at keyword arguments, option hashes, splats and destructuring.